Savory Collection
in the News

 
Ella Fitzgerald, Savory Collection, National Jazz Museum in Harlem

Once in a Standard: The Savory Collection

Jazz Times critic' Ben Ratliff  on why the work of jazz is never done. Published April 2, 2017. 

"Great as they are, these recordings don’t need to be monuments, something to be gathered around. When the recording is finished, the event you’re listening to is not. Instead, The Savory Collection is something you come inside—a locus, a place for listeners and musicians to pause and gather, maybe many times, and then go on and find the next thing like it."

 
 

Jumpin' At The Woodside' Catches Count Basie And His Band Honing Their Art

NPR Fresh Air's Kevin Whitehead on the release of the Savory Collection, Vol. 2. Published February 13, 2017.

"A new sampler features live cuts of Count Basie's band in New York from 1938 to 1940. Jazz Critic Kevin Whitehead says Jumpin' at the Woodside is full of "pretty terrific" music."

 
Count Basie, The Savory Collection, National Jazz Museum in Harlem
 

‘The Savory Collection, Volume 2—Jumpin’ at the Woodside: The Count Basie Orchestra Featuring Lester Young’ Review

Wall Street Journal critic Will Friedwald reviews the Savory Collection, Vol. 2. Published December 21, 2016

Once The Stuff of Jazz Legend, 1930s Recordings Are Finally Out.

NPR Morning Edition's Tom Vitale on the release of the Savory Collection, Vol. 1. Published December 8, 2016.

"In 1938, Ella Fitzgerald sang her first big hit, "A-Tisket, A-Tasket," for a national audience on CBS Radio. Now, a global audience has access to this performance again — thanks to the discovery and restoration of the Savory Collection, a legendary private trove of nearly 1,000 recordings that haven't been heard by the general public since the 1930s. "

 
Savory Collection Vol. 1 Cover, National Jazz Museum in Harlem

‘The Savory Collection,’ a Mythical Trove of Jazz Recordings, Will Get a Digital Release

The New York Times' Nate Chinen announces the release of the Savory Collection Vol. 1. Published September 23, 2016.

"A major jazz discovery will finally be commercially accessible to the public, courtesy of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem and Apple Music, which have partnered to release “The Savory Collection” in digital form. A series of archival recordings from the 1930s and early ’40s, from radio broadcasts taped by the pioneering sound engineer Bill Savory, it’s a revelatory body of music that had been cloaked in myth and obscurity for many years."

 

The Bill Savory Collection, CBS News

Anthony Mason reports on the discovery and restoration of the Savory Collection, including interviews with Bill Savory's son.  Published January 3, 2011.

 
Coleman Hawkins, Savory Collection, National Jazz Museum in Harlem

2010: The Year in Gigs

Jazz Times writer Nate Chinen reflects on the most memorable performances he saw during the year. Published January 1, 2011.

"My Gig of the Year took place 60 years ago, under less than favorable conditions, and it could easily have slipped everyone’s notice . . . I’m referring of course to the live version of “Body and Soul” performed by Coleman Hawkins in May of 1940 . . . By a wide margin, it’s the track I’ve pored over most this year, playing it on countless occasions and marveling anew each time."

 
Coleman Hawkins, Savory Collection, National Jazz Museum in Harlem

Jazz Master Outplays Himself

The New York Times' Ben Ratliff  on Coleman Hawkins' "Body & Soul" from the Savory Collection. Published August 17, 2010.

"It’s remarkable, this recording. It’s not just nice. It’s not just helpful to the historical record. It might be better than the one we feel obligated to compare it with.

 
Bill Savory, Savory Collection, National Jazz Museum in Harlem

Museum Acquires Storied Trove of Performances by Jazz Greats

The New York Times' Larry Rohter announces the acquisition of the Savory Collection by the National Jazz Museum in Harlem. Published August 16, 2010.

"For decades jazz cognoscenti have talked reverently of “the Savory Collection.” Recorded from radio broadcasts in the late 1930s by an audio engineer named William Savory, it was known to include extended live performances by some of the most honored names in jazz — but only a handful of people had ever heard even the smallest fraction of that music, adding to its mystique."